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Lessons from the MMR scare / Fiona Godlee.

Title: Lessons from the MMR scare / Fiona Godlee.
Author(s)/Relationship(s): Godlee, Fiona.
Publisher: [Bethesda, Md. : National Institutes of Health, 2011]
Description: 1 online resource (1 streaming video file (1 hr., 6 min.) : sd., col.)
Content Type: two-dimensional moving image
Media Type: computer
Carrier Type: online resource
Language: eng
Electronic Links: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?16828
MeSH Subjects: Scientific Misconduct
Data Collection --ethics
Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine --adverse effects
Lecture
Webcast
Other Subject(s): Wakefield, Andrew J.
Summary: (CIT): Please join BMJ Editor Fiona Godlee for a discussion of the stunning investigation she published earlier this year that revealed the MMR scare was based not on bad science but on deliberate fraud. The three-part series was produced by journalist Brian Deer, who spent seven years investigating Andrew Wakefield’s infamous study linking the MMR vaccine with autism, discovering Wakefield had been paid by a lawyer to influence his results and had blatantly manipulated the study data. In an editorial accompanying Deer’s report, Godlee and colleagues noted, "Science is based on trust. Without trust, research cannot function and evidence based medicine becomes a folly. Journal editors, peer reviewers, readers, and critics have all based their responses to Wakefield’s small case series on the assumption that the facts had at least been honestly documented. Such a breach of trust is deeply shocking. And even though almost certainly rare on this scale, it raises important questions about how this could happen, what could have been done to uncover it earlier, what further inquiry is now needed, and what can be done to prevent something like this happening again."
Notes: Closed-captioned.
NLM Unique ID: 101571656
Other ID Numbers: (DNLM)CIT:16828
(OCoLC)762697351

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